I have posted in the past on pleating styles and fullness, but today I thought I would combine the two subjects to show you how different amounts of fullness look on a box pleated velour drape.

As I mentioned in my previous post, a box pleat is created by bringing the fabric together to form a loop on the face of the drape.  This loop is then flattened against the face of the drape in equal parts to either side, making a “box” shape, and is then sewn into place at the top of the drape.   The greater the desired fullness, the larger the loop, and resulting “box,” will be.  Below are several examples of the most commonly used amounts of fullness used with box pleating.

50% Fullness

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With 50% fullness, the drape is initially constructed as a flat drape at 50% wider than the desired finished width. Once that extra width is converted into box pleats, the pleats are approximately 3″ wide, with ample visual space between the pleats.

This is a common choice for legs and other secondary drapes, and also sometimes for Grand Drapes for those who want beautiful velour bi-parting traveller drapes but need to stretch the budget (such as schools).

75% Fullness

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With 75% fullness, the drape is initially constructed as a flat drape at 75% wider than the desired finished width. Once that extra width is converted into pleats, the pleats are approximately 4 1/2″ wide, with a little less visual space between the pleats.

100% Fullness

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With 100% fullness, the drape is initially constructed as a flat drape at 100% wider than the desired finished width (or essentially twice the finished width).  Once that extra width is converted into pleats, the pleats are approximately 6″ wide, with the pleats visually appearing fairly close together.

This is the most commonly requested fullness for Bi-Parting Grand Drapes in larger theatres and auditoriums.  It is also often chosen (along with a heavier, deeper napped velour) by venues wanting added sound absorbency, as the combination of the heavy deep napped fabric and the added fullness help to absorb sound.